Meet Our Tutors: Mr. Jeff

Meet Our Tutors: Mr. Jeff

Meet Our Tutors: Mr. Jeff

Jeff is a math education fanatic. He taught high school math and science for 5 years where he developed a passion for integrating technology into curriculum and instruction.

Jeff moved to Colorado to pursue his passion for supporting teachers with technology in a PhD program at CU Boulder working with Dr. David Webb. During his journey through graduate school, Jeff has worked as a computer science teacher trainer, developed curricular resources for middle and high school teachers, taught elementary math education courses, mentored pre-service teachers in integrating project based learning into their teaching, and helped design tools to support teachers in implementing real time formative assessment.

Tutor Mr. Jeff Bush
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When did you know you wanted to be a teacher?

Leading wilderness trips for the YMCA in college showed me how rewarding it is to work with youth and support them as they learn to become more independent, confident and empowered. After college, I pursued teaching to work with youth year round and have summers open to still guide wilderness trips. While teaching, I developed an interest in how teachers need more support in integrating technology into their formative assessment practices and how students need access to tools that make math accessible and empowering, not phobia-inducing. That led me to graduate school and pursuit of a PhD at CU Boulder where my research and teaching have covered a wide range of projects but all mostly focused around the central theme of supporting math teachers, particularly with technology use and formative assessment.
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Tell us about an inspirational or funny moment you had with a student.

After my first year teaching, I woke the first day of summer feeling down about my own ability to teach math and inspire high school students. This is not uncommon for first year teachers but knowing that didn’t seem very comforting. My supervisor and mentor noticed my mood at our morning meeting told me that Michael Jordan didn’t become the star he was in his first year playing ball. It took him years of practice. This was inspiring to me. I had been telling my students that their hard work would pay off and that they could become better learners with more hard work. The same lesson applied to teaching. Later that day, a student wrote me an email talking about how he had been thinking about dropping out but often thought back to our Algebra class and how I had been patient with him, even though he didn’t always get the concepts right away. I encouraged him to retake quizzes and come in for extra help. Even though he didn’t always take me up on it, he said that knowing I believed in him is part of what helped keep him in school. I think back to that day as a pivotal moment where I decided I wouldn’t ‘drop out’ of a career in education but instead would work as hard as I could to become an all-star educator.

I had been telling my students that their hard work would pay off and that they could become better learners with more hard work. The same lesson applied to teaching.

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What’s your favourite thing about online tutoring?

I really like using our digital tools to help students become savvy math wizards. I use the fraction tools and other manipulatives whenever I can. I also love color coding with the drawing tool. Colors help guide notes but also can be a ton of fun!
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Why did you become a Woot Tutor?

Although I teach young teachers as a graduate student, I don’t get as many opportunities to work with k-12 students. Not only is it something that I enjoy, it also helps me practice and apply techniques that I read about in academia and develop an understanding for how to connect research and practice.
Jeff Bush on a summit
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What do you love about the Woot program?

I love that we teach kids to become self sufficient. I believe that everyone can become a “math person” with the right support, tools and attitude. Instead of being the tool that you rely on, Woot shows you the tools to use as you become an independent learner.
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What do you love doing in your spare time?

I love adventuring in the outdoors with my 5 year old Husky-mix, Sterling, and cooking delicious food for my friends and loved ones. Recently, I have also really taken to gardening. Nothing beets (oh, I like puns too) the feeling of a home grown meal.
Jeff Bush with his dog Sterling
Jeff has a Bachelors of Arts from Bowdoin College in Environmental Studies and Geology and a Masters in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Colorado. When he finds some time to himself, Jeff enjoys baking bread, adventuring in the mountains, and trail running with his 5 year old Husky mix, Sterling.

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Back-to-School Tips for Parents

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Jenny Ward

Jenny Ward

Woot Math Content Manager

Back-to-School Tips for Parents

The summer is flying by and before you know it school will be back in full swing.

As a mom of four kids ranging in age from kindergarten to middle school, the start of each school year brings a lot of changes to our household. With these changes come a mix of emotions; excitement is met with a bit of anxiety. We will relish these last few weeks of summer and then jump into back-to-school mode. I’d love to share a few tips and tricks we implement to make a smoother transition back to school.

Top 5 tips for back-to-school:

school building
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Convey Confidence & Enthusiasm

Making sure children feel confident and excited about returning to school is one of the most important things parents can do to help their child. The enthusiasm we project sets the tone for their attitude. Many kids find the newness of each year to be a little intimidating. Remind your child of things that went well last year. From special times with friends to the awesome teachers they’ll soon see, encourage them to think about all the things they have to look forward to doing again.

Most importantly, tell your child how proud you are of them. Let them know that you believe this could be their most successful year yet!

If your student hit a rough patch last year, remind them that this is a new year and a fresh start. They will likely have a new teacher with new classmates which can change the entire classroom dynamic and learning environment. If your student struggled academically, now can be a great time to review those topics and skills so they start the school year feeling confident. Most importantly, tell your child how proud you are of them. Let them know that you believe this could be their most successful year yet!

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Collaborate On a Plan

It is empowering for kids to have a say in their day-to-day routines and schedule and there are few things better to promote buy-in from the whole family. Start off the new school year with a plan that you and your child create together. Encourage your child to think about how they will structure their after-school time. What activities do they want to participate in, and how will that impact their schedule? It’s important to help your child think through their workload when making this plan, especially as they get older and have more homework demands. Are there any new activities or clubs they want to check out? Is it realistic to be involved in two sports and three clubs? How much time will be needed for homework, and when will it be completed? If your student’s homework load is minimal, encourage them to use the “homework time” to read about something they are curious about, a fun book picked at the library. It can be a time to write and reflect, or even practice their math facts. The point is to carve out a consistent time for intentional learning.

Another fun way to get your child excited to go back to school is going school supply shopping. What kid is not excited to get new supplies? I also have found that supply lists can give terrific insight into the work ahead, and like to use them to talk about how they might be used with my kids. My kids love to write and draw so we often talk about what each composition notebook will hold. I can remember transitioning to high school and wondering how to use a compass and protractor in Geometry or how to navigate a graphing calculator. These tools can take some practice, so playing around and figuring things out before school starts can be helpful.

If your student will be going to a new school, plan to take a tour before school starts to help them feel more at ease on the first day of school. Many schools host a teacher meet and greet or back to school night before school starts which is another great opportunity for you and your student to meet their new teachers and get familiarized with the school and checkout their new classrooms, lockers, lunchroom, gym and more. This provided so much comfort to my oldest when she went off to middle school last year. Learning how to open a locker for the first time can be tricky. Navigating big hallways to get to classes on opposite sides of the building in short passing periods is also an intimidating task. So I strongly encourage practicing these skills before school starts for a much smoother transition to school.

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Restart a Daily Routine

Often during the summer we slip into a different, more relaxed routine with later bedtimes. My older kids shift the most often staying up past their normal bedtime and then sleeping late into the morning. To get back on track, I start a school-schedule with regular bedtimes and regular wake up times a couple weeks before school starts. It is probably the most important thing I do to help ease the stress of returning to school. This year, I am also going to have us practice their whole routine a few days before school starts. From picking out clothes and setting their alarm the night before to waking up and completing their morning ritual, getting in the car and heading to the bus stop.

It is not only important to consider the morning routine but also the flow of the after school schedule. Most kids need a little time to decompress after a long day of learning. Providing a healthy snack and then some time to get outside or do something active can be a great way to move into this part of the day. Once they have a bit of time to get some energy out, kids are more able to settle down to focus on homework.

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Celebrate Week 1

The first week back to school can be filled with lots of emotions and sometimes challenges. Engage with your child and celebrate the victories of the week! Here are a few questions you might consider asking your child this week:
  • Was there anything that surprised them?
  • What are they most looking forward to?
  • What challenges do they think they might face this year? Process with your child ways they might be able to overcome these challenges.
  • Did they meet any new friends?
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Weekly Check-in

Weekly check-ins are important for all ages, but it can be challenging getting some children to open up and chat about things as they get older. I know my middle school-age daughter would prefer alone time in her room instead of talking to me about every detail of her day, so sometimes it requires more effort to find out what is going on in their world. However, bedtime can be a great time to check-in and spend a little one-on-one time hearing about their day or how things are going with friends. You can inquire about the best and worst parts of their day or week. How is their homework load? Do they feel they have a good routine going? Finding a time that works for each of my kids, whether over a shared dinner or at bedtime, helps us stay connected during the school year!

I hope these tips help you prepare, and I wish you and your family a terrific new school year.

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What is Executive Function, and Why Should Every Parent Care?

Image of Light Bulb inside a head
Image of Light Bulb inside a head
Cindy Goldrich

Cindy Goldrich

Woot Tutor Coach

What is Executive Function, and Why Should Every Parent Care?

As parents, we want nothing more than for our children to reach their potential and thrive in the world.

Fortunately, science now helps us understand what gets in the way of some people being able to achieve their goals, large and small. You may have heard the term “Executive Function.” It is part of the brain located in the prefrontal cortex, and it is the last part of the brain to develop. Executive Functions are the cognitive skills that give us the ability to focus, plan, and act in a goal-directed manner — and current research shows that these functions are responsible for how effective we are at managing ourselves.

Diagram of Executive Functions

While children are young – it is generally the parents and teachers who act as the CEO of the brain. Our goal is that as our children develop and mature, they gradually become their own CEO’s.

I like to think of each of the Executive Functions as being a manager, and the overall manager is the CEO, Chief Executive Officer, of the brain captured in table below. I am going to describe what our Executive Functions are briefly, and you will see why being weak in a particular area can impact performance, regardless of how intelligent and motivated, we are.

MANAGERS – SKILLS THAT HELPS YOU DO WANT YOU DECIDE TO DO

Initiation/
Activation

These are the skills needed to get started on a task without undue procrastination. For example: get ready for school, start homework, begin a project.

Working Memory

Working memory is the “mental workspace” where we temporarily store, retain, and manipulate information. It requires the ability to use the brain’s “search engine” to hold on to and manipulate new information, while the brain figures out if it can connect this information to more long-term storage.

Self-Monitoring

Self-monitoring involves being able to use self-talk to monitor and regulate one's behavior, as well as to direct future actions. Using self-talk is a vital component involved in planning and problem-solving.

Effort

This is the ability to stay alert, engaged, and respond to a stimulus in a timely manner. Impairments in processing speed can affect a student’s ability to read, complete math problems, listen and take notes, make decisions, and participate in group discussions.

Attention

These are the skills related to controlling who and what you are paying attention to, staying on topic, filtering out other thoughts and ideas, and moving on from one activity to another as is appropriate.

Planning and Organization

These are the skills that involve setting a goal and creating a strategy to meet that goal. Planning for a future event requires forethought, estimation, and problem-solving

Emotion Regulation

Emotion regulation is the ability to understand and accept your emotional experience, to manage your emotions, and to respond with behavior that is appropriate in that moment. In the school environment, students must engage in emotion regulation on a daily basis. For example, they need to manage how they react to disappointing grades, struggles with their peers, and expectations that they may find frustrating, boring, or too challenging.

When we think about each of these Executive Functions as skills, then we realize that some kids need more direct instruction and support to develop confidence and proficiency. Understanding what Executive Functions are and how they impact learning, motivation, and behavior are the first step parents need to take knowing how to best support their child’s development.

At Woot Tutor, we believe it is essential that all children learn about their brains so that they can become their own best managers.

Note: If you have a child who seems to be struggling in many of these areas more than would seem expected for their age, you may want to seek an evaluation from a professional to see if ADHD or learning challenges are impacting their ability to perform

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Meet Our Tutors: Ms. Diana

Meet Our Tutors: Diana

Meet Our Tutors: Ms. Diana

Diana is a high school math teacher with a passion for differentiating and connecting with all students. Her goal in life is to create "ah-ha!" moments for students.

She has been teaching for four years, with experience as a middle school teacher and she has worked closely with kids with wide ranging special needs. She has been a tutor for six years and is dedicated to every clients overall academic success.

We asked Diana to answer a few questions, so that you can get to know her a little bit.a

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When did you know you wanted to be a teacher?

I knew I wanted to become a teacher when I was sixteen years old. I had always loved school and loved to learn. I would form study groups with friends and I realized that teaching is the best way to learn.
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Tell us about a teacher that believed in you and made a difference in your life?

I worked with the same math tutor from seventh grade to twelfth grade. He changed my understanding of what it meant to be a hard worker. He sat with me for hours until I understood a concept. He would allow me to explore and ask questions and he always had a clear answer. He taught me that patience and a clean piece of paper is crucial for success in mathematics.

He taught me that patience and a clean piece of paper is crucial for success in mathematics.

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What’s your favourite thing about online tutoring?

Online tutoring allows me to connect with clients no matter where they are. This brings ease and convenience to the clients. I love to connect ideas using the multitude of tools on the platform. Woot Tutor makes it easy to make true mathematical connections and successes for students!
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Why did you become a Woot Tutor?

I became a Woot Teacher because I love the opportunity to grow my tutoring experience and connect with students regardless of their location. Also, the tools the platform provides are exciting, I am able to have students use multiple representations such as tables, text and writing.
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What do you love about the Woot program?

Once again, the technology allows for deeper discussion and exploration of the content. The Woot Program takes everything I love about tutoring – personal connection, coaching, and student centered learning – and allows me and the client to connect anywhere! This is a very powerful platform because it gives flexibility in what is usually a rigid schedule. When working with families, things come up and they need to reschedule. Using the Woot Tutor program makes rescheduling a breeze!
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What do you love doing in your spare time?

Traveling the world and cooking are my two passions outside of teaching. I love bringing people together with food.
photo of Diana Rapp
Diana has a B.A. from the University of Colorado Boulder in Mathematics and Education and a M.A. in Mathematics Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Colorado Boulder. Diana is a charismatic people person who loves to cook for friends and travel the world.

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The Top 5 Things to Look for in a Tutor

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Krista Marks

Krista Marks

The Top 5 Things to Look for in a Tutor

We know that tutoring is effective; we know that from our own experience and we know it from a long history of research on the subject.

Unlike in a classroom setting, tutors can tailor their instruction to meet each individual child’s need. Instead of getting stuck and feeling lost in class, a student can work with their tutor to identify and address gaps in understanding and then quickly move forward. Even more powerful is the ability for great tutors to connect with students and build close personal relationships – relationships that can lift students up. 

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Great tutors adopt the role of a coach.

Rather than showcase their knowledge, the best tutors never lose focus on the student’s learning. They ask questions to get the student to think deeply and explain what they are learning. The best tutors live for that moment when a child realizes that they figured something out entirely on their own. 

A coach doesn’t play the game for you.
A coach helps you have the skills to play the game.

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Great tutors value building relationships.

Of course learning and knowledge matter, but the journey towards both require meaningful relationships. When a tutor believes in a student, cares about a student, invests in a student, great things happen. At its heart, learning connects humans, in the moment and across time and space. Great tutors feel this deeply.

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Great tutors ask good questions.

By asking exploratory questions, great tutors are able to quickly identify gaps in a student’s understanding. By asking challenging questions, they can get a student to question their assumptions and correct errors on their own. By asking relational questions, they encourage a student to think about differences and similarities critical to developing deeper understanding. By asking summarizing questions, great tutors check for understanding to ensure a student is on track. 

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Great tutors encourage a growth mindset.

Often a student struggles because of a lack of confidence, not a lack in understanding the material. By providing a safe place where failure and mistakes aren’t only encouraged but celebrated, great tutors help make mistakes a completely normal part of learning. The recognition that productive struggle is central to learning is at the heart of what we mean when we say fostering a growth mindset. 

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Great tutors know their subject but also the art and science of learning and teaching.

A skilled instructor knows the concepts that a student needs to master in order to build a solid foundation. That is the science of learning. The art of learning is the art of assessing students. Assessing doesn’t have to mean taking a test. It is a method that an instructor uses to gather data they need to understand where a student is and help them get where they are going. When this is done well, it not only provides tutors with data on a student’s performance but also increases the student’s agency over their learning. 

These 5 characteristics of a great tutor are at the heart of student-centered instruction. At Woot Tutor, it is our responsibility to identify, recruit and retain great tutors – tutors that connect deeply with the students they support. Tutors that lift children up, one child at a time so that they have the foundation they need to follow their dreams.

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Welcome to Woot Tutor

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Open Door graphic
Krista Marks

Krista Marks

CEO

Welcome to Woot Tutor

Thank you so much for visiting our site and taking the time to read about us. Woot Tutor is an online math tutoring solution for students in middle and high school throughout the US.

Our tutoring solution has evolved from our decades of experience developing award-winning classroom technology. 

50% of students in the U.S. don’t make it through algebra. How can you make certain your child isn’t left behind? 1:1 tutoring is one of the few proven approaches, and access to great tutoring should not be limited by where you live, your busy schedule, or traffic.

While there are many choices for tutoring – local high school kids, college students, Skype tutors, tutoring centers – choosing the right one for your child matters. You want to trust that the tutor understands your child and is able to support them in building their academic skills, interests, and confidence.

Woot Tutor has a unique approach combining 1:1 math tutoring with state-of-the-art online tools and coaching in life skills (like study habits, organization, and time management) to deliver an unparalleled tutoring experience. Our tutors are working math teachers who are the best and brightest in their field. Teachers that can deliver personalized instruction that is equal parts accountability and heart, and that aren’t bound by geographical lines. 

We’ve built Woot Tutor from a foundation of proven research in math education. Our team has decades of experience in helping schools and districts ensure students succeed with an award winning adaptive software program. As part of Woot Tutor, your child can access this program to extend and deepen the tutoring session. During the school year, we also provide just-in-time help with our homework-help hotline. Students get credits that they can use to get the support they need when they need it.

Our unique approach has 4 key elements:

  1. Online 1:1 tutoring with top math teachers
  2. Coaching to help develop life skills
  3. Real-time homework and test prep support 
  4. Adaptive learning software to address gaps in understanding

At Woot Tutor we never lose sight of the fact that the relationships that help children succeed are the ones that lift them up. The tutoring program we have developed makes it possible, regardless of where you live, to lift your child up and ensure they have the confidence and academic skills they need to follow their dreams. Thank you for learning about Woot Tutor. It would be an honor to support your family. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to reach out at contact@woottutor.com

 

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How A&W Revealed Our Problems With Fractions

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Hamburger image
Mark Kruger

Mark Kruger

How A&W Revealed Our Problems With Fractions

One of the most vivid arithmetic failings displayed by Americans occurred in the early 1980s, when the A&W restaurant chain released a new hamburger to rival the McDonald’s Quarter Pounder.

With a third-pound of beef, the A&W burger had more meat than the Quarter Pounder; in taste tests, customers preferred A&W’s burger. And it was less expensive. A lavish A&W television and radio marketing campaign cited these benefits. Yet instead of leaping at the great value, customers snubbed it.

Only when the company held customer focus groups did it become clear why. The Third Pounder presented the American public with a test in fractions. And we failed. Misunderstanding the value of one-third, customers believed they were being overcharged. Why, they asked the researchers, should they pay the same amount for a third of a pound of meat as they did for a quarter-pound of meat at McDonald’s. The “4” in “¼,” larger than the “3” in “⅓,” led them astray.

This excerpt is from a New York Times article titled “Why Do Americans Stink at Math?” Read the entire article here.

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Meet Our Coaches: Ms Cindy

Coach Cindy

Meet Our Coaches: Ms Cindy

Cindy’s passion is supporting parents so that they can effectively support their kids. Cindy found that the better she can help parents truly understand what impacts their kids learning, motivation, and behavior, the more they can help their kids thrive.

We asked Cindy to answer a few questions, so that you can get to know her a little bit.

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Why did you decide to become a parent coach?

While I was coaching children, I found that very well-meaning, loving parents were struggling in their attempts to motivate and support their kids. I recognized that parents didn’t always have the knowledge, tools, and strategies they needed to intervene as needed. I found I could make an enormous impact on the whole family when I worked directly with the parents, empowering them to be more confident, effective parents.

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What is your favorite thing about working with parents?

Having parents share their stories of joy and success as the calm, laughter, and connection returns to their relationships with their children. Parenting isn’t easy! And it can be even more complex when you have a child who learns and behaves differently than is expected. The insights and tools I offer can shift the family dynamic to build children’s confidence, resilience, and grit as they face school and life challenges.

I found I could make an enormous impact on the whole family when I worked directly with the parents, empowering them to be more confident, effective parents.

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What is your parenting philosophy?

Parent the child YOU have! I believe that each child who enters into our lives is creative, resourceful, and whole. Our job is to help them become the best version of who they are meant to be. It’s not always easy to see them struggle and know how to support without enabling their development. The key lies in knowing what they are truly capable of in the moment and how to help them develop the skills they really need to thrive.

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How did you become involved in teacher training?

As a parent coach, I often consulted in schools to support my client’s children. While educators are often excellent at teaching curriculum, not all teachers have the most recent training needed to support students who struggle with attentional or behavioral challenges. Over time, I developed a curriculum to teach teachers, SLP’s, OT’s, and mental health professionals about the impact of ADHD and Executive Function challenges on learning, motivation and behavior. For almost a decade I have travelled nationwide providing professional development in schools and conferences providing them with the insights, tools, and strategies they need to reach even the most challenging students.
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What do you love about the Woot program?

I love that WOOT focuses on building kids Executive Function skills as they help kids learn math. This approach helps kids learn to generalize the lessons they learn in math to other aspects of their academic and personal challenges.

Cindy jumping on a rock

Cindy has a Master’s in Counseling from Columbia University and is a certified ADHD/Executive Function Coach. Through her books and her parenting programs she has helped thousands of parents reduce the stress and chaos to bring joy and success into their homes.

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Meet Our Tutors: Ms Janelle

Meet Our Tutors: Janelle

Meet Our Tutors: Ms Janelle

Teaching is Janelle's dream job. She especially loves middle school because “the students are growing and changing in every way, and trying to figure out how to be their best selves.”
Janelle believes that middle school mathematics provides the foundation for many necessary real world skills. She loves to learn new things and considers herself a lifelong learner.She is also the parent of two middle schoolers. We asked Janelle to answer a few questions, so that you can get to know her a little bit.
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When did you know you wanted to be a teacher?

I remember playing school with my cousins when we were little, and I always wanted to be the teacher. I pursued a business degree right after high school, and am grateful that corporate finance gave me practical experience to apply in the classroom, but having children reminded me how much I wanted to teach and work in education, and I officially made the switch fifteen years ago.
Janelle and family
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Tell us about a teacher that believed in you and made a difference in your life?

My 5th grade teacher was truly inspirational. He went above and beyond in every single way. I remember how he wrote meaningful feedback on my creative writing assignments, and offered one on one support when I struggled on a math problem. He made me sit next to another student that was very intimidating to me, and we ended up best friends. He had a sense of humor, but he also didn’t let anyone get away with too much silliness. He was also there for us outside of class. For example, he walked by my grandparent’s house the day of the spring equinox and came inside to help us experiment with standing an egg on its end. He made a huge impression on me because he was consistent, compassionate, and equitable at all times.

My 5th grade teacher…made a huge impression on me because he was consistent, compassionate, and equitable at all times.

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What’s your favourite thing about online tutoring?

Online tutoring provides a one-on-one experience, but at your convenience. We are able to cater to a student’s individual needs at a time and location that works best for them and their family. Woot Tutor integrates an easy to use platform with a variety of technological tools, combined with the online chat experience, and access to their already proven adaptive learning tools making it an incomparable opportunity.

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Why did you become a Woot Tutor?

I have worked with Woot Math for several years. In my experience, there is not a better tool for building rational number sense. I have used Woot polls regularly for formative assessment and the adaptive learning to help students conceptualize their understanding of fractions. I love working with a company that is constantly striving to create a tool that meets the needs of students and teachers.

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What do you love doing in your spare time?

My number one favorite thing to do is spend time with my family when I can. I am very fortunate to have a large family all living close by. A close second favorite activity is reading. I enjoy all genres and often have three or four books going at a time.
Janelle at the Lincoln Memorial
Janelle Stanton is a full-time math teacher at Broomfield Heights Middle School. She has been a middle school math teacher for ten years. Before becoming a math teacher, she worked in corporate finance. She says that the experience she has had outside of education has supported learning in her classrooms because she can often answer the question, “When will we ever need to know this?” She has presented at local and national math education conferences, e.g., the MidSchool Math National Conference. Janelle has a BA in Business Administration with an emphasis on Accounting and Finance, an MBA, and a Masters in Secondary Education with emphasis on Mathematics.

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